connecting for work https://shapingedu.asu.edu/ en H. Rose Trostle: Broadband Access, Indian Country, and Cyber Warriors https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/h-rose-trostle-broadband-access-indian-country-and-cyber-warriors <h1 class="article"> H. Rose Trostle: Broadband Access, Indian Country, and Cyber Warriors </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/22/2021 - 17:48</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu-broadband_access-logo3.png?itok=mc25WpSH" width="1224" height="451" alt="ShapingEDU Broadband-Access Initiative Graphic" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work">connecting for work</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> H. Rose Trostle: Broadband Access, Indian Country, and Cyber Warriors </h1> </div> <div class="block"> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Broadband access in </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs141p2_024362.pdf">Indian Country</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> is not just a product of it often being rural and remote,” </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/hannahtrostle/">H. Rose Trostle</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> (they/them/theirs), Research Professional at the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://aipi.asu.edu/about">American Indian Policy Institute</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> at Arizona State University, observed recently during an interview for the ShapingEDU </span><em style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog">Reshaping Learning blog</a></em><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. “Broadband infrastructure often relies on access to other forms of infrastructure, such as electric lines or cell towers.</span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-media"> <div class="embedded-media" align="left"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/trostle_hannah1.png?itok=0pcal3Km" width="335" height="354" alt="Photo of H. Rose Trostle" title="H. Rose Trostle" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <figcaption><span><em><strong>H. Rose Trostle; photo by Christopher Mitchell</strong></em></span></figcaption></figure><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“The short-term problem is determining what kind of technology makes sense for each community because Indian Country is not a monolithic whole [574 federally-recognized tribes with more than 60 state-recognized tribes in the U.S.],” they continued. “The challenges that are faced in Alaska are very different than the challenges faced in southern California. We need policies and programs that can respond to this diversity. The long-term challenge is infrastructure development generally in Indian Country, from the mapping and development of improved road infrastructure to the further expansion of water lines. We need to consider broadband infrastructure as just one piece of the puzzle and ensure that communities have the planning capacity to determine what works best.”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Trostle, a member of the ShapingEDU </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/project/universal-broadband-access-us">“Connecting for Work and Learning”</a><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_universal_service">universal broadband</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> initiative </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/Universal-Broadband-Organizing-Committee">organizing committee</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and author of the recently-published </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://cdn.ilsr.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/IndigenousFutureZones-0221.pdf"> “Building Indigenous Future Zones: Four Tribal Broadband Case Studies”</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> report, has always been interested in Internet access.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“I grew up in a rural community without great access to the Internet, but it was functional. I learned Latin via list-serv and early videoconferencing programs. I got more involved in advocacy around Internet access when I started my first job out of college as an intern at the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://ilsr.org/about-the-institute-for-local-self-reliance/">Institute for Local Self-Reliance</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. That organization focuses on municipal and community networks,” they recall.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“When I was in high school, I took some online courses and would routinely experience Internet connection problems. In at least one case, this was caused by my neighbor down the road cutting through the DSL line. It was a rural area, and the infrastructure was not necessarily well-marked. The Internet connection was also not always functional enough to do video conferencing that was required. It made learning very difficult. Because of this, I have been very focused on expanding broadband access (high-speed Internet access) in rural and Tribal communities.”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">As for the neighbor who inadvertently cut that connection: “My parents had a conversation with the neighbor, who was apologetic, but it did not bring us closer. He had been performing work in the right of way, which was not permitted at the time. He also did not necessarily understand the importance of having an Internet connection.”</span></p> <div class="embedded-media" building="" indigenous="" future="" zones:="" four="" tribal="" broadband="" case="" studies="" report="" by="" h.="" rose="" trostle=""> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/trostle-building_indigenous_future_zones-cover.png?itok=Ws_RQ9D0" width="504" height="653" alt="Cover of " title="Cover of &quot;Building Indigenous Future Zones&quot; report" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Reading their report further humanizes the impact lack of broadband access has on communities and, more importantly, offers possible roadmaps for broadband advocates seeking creative, collaborative paths to replicate the successful expansion of broadband access that is taking place in Indian Country. In each of their case studies (</span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.red-spectrum.com/">Red Spectrum Communications</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Idaho; </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://nezperce.org/government/technology-services/">Nez Perce Tribe Department of Technology  Services</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho; </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.aaniin.net/aboutus.html">Aaniin Fiber Services</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, Fond du Lac Band, Minnesota; and </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://mohawk-networks.com/about-us/">Mohawk Networks</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, St. Regis Mohawk Tribe, New York), there is an underlying story of underserved communities; long-term commitment to solving problems; flexibility/adaptability; and collaboration. Key lessons cited at the end of the report include:</span></p><p style="padding-left: 30px;"><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em>Improving access to capital:</em></strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> “Native Nations have had to be creative when looking for funding.”</span></p><p style="padding-left: 30px;"><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em>Avoiding single-purpose funding:</em></strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> Federal funding “is often limited to a single purpose, such as connecting Indian Health Services facilities or schools &amp; libraries…The </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.shlb.org/about">Schools, Health, &amp; Libraries Broadband Coalition</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> encourages a concept called ‘To and Through Anchors’ to get past these silos.”</span></p><p style="padding-left: 30px;"><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em>Recognizing the Preparation Needed to Take Advantage of Opportunities:</em></strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> “Native Nations that have already started projects or have plans to start projects can easily jump on new funding opportunities.”</span></p><p style="padding-left: 30px;"><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em>Assuring that communities benefit from new job opportunities that accompany broadband-access projects:</em></strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> “Training and hiring locally is a benefit to the community, and this means that contracted workers do not have to travel far to work on a project.”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Within each of these communities, there are people who took up the challenge and saw opportunity there,” Trostle observes. “They did not just focus on what they did not have, but on what they could do with better broadband access. This enabled them to write grants to show proof-of-concept projects, and they leveraged these initial successes to get larger funding opportunities. They also worked with the community to determine what the community needed and wanted. It was not about improving Internet access for the sake of improving infrastructure metrics, but about what community members wanted to do with better connectivity. The IT [Information Technology] and Planning professionals whom I interviewed really highlighted the importance of understanding the community strengths and how they could get to better Internet service with these strengths. They also were realistic about their financial plans, which meant they could develop networks that made sense for their communities.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“[A] story that comes to mind is from my conversation with </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/jason-hollinday-4a2b9838/">Jason Hollinday</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> at the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.fdlrez.com/">Fond du Lac Band’s</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> Planning Division. They spent years at Fond du Lac trying to develop a broadband plan, and they kept being turned down for grant funding. These slow starts, however, made them recognize the importance of describing what the community actually wanted from a broadband network. The planning division got more feedback from the community members and realized that </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.mprnews.org/story/2018/09/15/northeast-minnesota-native-american-tribe-aims-to-turn-the-reservation-high-speed">they needed to dream bigger</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> for their network. The wireless network that they had initially proposed would not work for the whole community because of the terrain and the capacity limits. They needed a fiber network, and by learning from all their failed starts, </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://blandinonbroadband.org/2021/02/18/recent-report-on-history-and-status-of-broadband-in-tribal-areas-including-fond-du-lac-in-mn/">they were able to write a successful grant to secure funding for a fiber network</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Something that is very important that we haven’t fully touched on here: Broadband access in Indian Country is getting better,” Trostle suggests. “We do not have great data available, but it has improved over the years. And one of the reasons for that is Native Nations building their own networks or collaborating with other local governments or local cooperatives to build this infrastructure. This is an exciting time with the recent allocation of the 2.5GHz Spectrum to Native Nations. There is more opportunity than ever for  improved broadband access in Indian Country. We are all learning and building together.”</span> </p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu-broadband_access-logo3.png?itok=mc25WpSH" width="1224" height="451" alt="ShapingEDU Broadband-Access Initiative Graphic" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">To talk with Trostle is to become increasingly aware of the importance of engagement and empathy in any discussion about broadband access. To talk about “broadband access” is to carry on a conversation that lacks emotional impact. To talk about “the ways that people can use this to enhance what they do in their daily lives” moves it into the realm of storytelling for engagement and inspiration—which Trostle does with laser-sharp focus.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“In my work, I center the voices of the people that I interview and their perspectives on what matters to their communities,” they admit. “These stories form the foundation of the work that I do when I dive into data analysis or mapping. I focus on stories of solutions rather than of deficit. There are many stories about how Native Nations have built their own broadband infrastructure or improved cell service in their communities. But we often do not hear about them because they are local projects that the national media does not pick up on. When I do my work, I try to ask not just about the problems, but on what people have already tried or accomplished to change the situation, to change the narrative. Indian Country has a lot of stories of resilience and creativity, and broadband access is one of them.”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Reflecting on the work of broadband advocates they admire, Trostle says “I have been really impressed with the work of </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewrantanen/">Matthew Rantanen</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> from </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://sctca.net/southern-california-tribal-digital-village/">Tribal Digital Village</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. He is always willing to speak with Federal and Tribal government officials on Tribal broadband. He is quite an advocate for broadband and seems to always be at the forefront of broadband advocacy groups. I’ve had the opportunity to talk to him a few times, and I have always come away with more ideas and more motivation to do the work that needs to be done. He is sometimes called </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://nativesciencereport.org/2021/04/a-cyber-warrior-for-broadband/">the Cyber Warrior</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">.”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">For broadband advocates looking for guidance, Trostle suggests talking to government officials, neighbors, and visitors to your community.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Find out what your community values in an Internet  connection,” they say. “Get involved with local advocacy groups for digital inclusion to distribute devices or offer digital skills trainings. Learn more about different types of devices and different types of broadband technologies. Encourage your local officials to work with other communities nearby.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“It is important to keep an eye on funding opportunities and to make sure that smaller communities are not left out of broadband expansion plans. Keep an eye out for state funding opportunities as well. Keep track of </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.fcc.gov/general/universal-service">what’s happening at the FCC</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. Remember that your local officials know your story, but that national organizations often do not. Share your ideas and your thoughts because they are valuable.” </span></p><p><em><strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">N.B.: The <a href="https://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/?s=Promoting+Universal+Broadband+Access+in+Indian+Country+With+H.+Rose+Trostle">original lightly-edited transcript</a> of the interview providing material for this article is posted on Paul's </span></strong></em><strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><a href="https://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/">Building Creative Bridges</a> <em>blog.</em></span></strong></p> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/aaniin-fiber-services" hreflang="en">aaniin fiber services</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/american-indian-policy-institute" hreflang="en">american indian policy institute</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/building-indigenous-future-zones" hreflang="en">building indigenous future zones</a> <a href="/blog/tag/collaboration" hreflang="en">collaboration</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/couer-dalene-tribe" hreflang="en">couer d&#039;alene tribe</a> <a href="/blog/tag/cyber-warrior" hreflang="en">cyber warrior</a> <a href="/blog/tag/department-technology-services" hreflang="en">department of technology services</a> <a href="/blog/tag/fond-du-lac-band" hreflang="en">fond du lac band</a> <a href="/blog/tag/h-rose-trostle" hreflang="en">h. rose trostle</a> <a href="/blog/tag/indian-country" hreflang="en">indian country</a> <a href="/blog/tag/institute-local-self-reliance" hreflang="en">institute for local self-reliance</a> <a href="/blog/tag/jason-hollinday" hreflang="en">jason hollinday</a> <a href="/blog/tag/matthew-rantanen" hreflang="en">matthew rantanen</a> <a href="/blog/tag/mohawk-networks" hreflang="en">mohawk networks</a> <a href="/blog/tag/nez-perce-tribe" hreflang="en">nez perce tribe</a> <a href="/blog/tag/shlb" hreflang="en">shlb</a> <a href="/blog/tag/red-spectrum-communications" hreflang="en">red spectrum communications</a> <a href="/blog/tag/schools-health-and-libraries-broadband-coalition" hreflang="en">schools health and libraries broadband coalition</a> <a href="/blog/tag/st-regis-mohawk-tribe" hreflang="en">st. regis mohawk tribe</a> <a href="/blog/tag/tribal-digital-village" hreflang="en">tribal digital village</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 23 Jun 2021 00:48:00 +0000 psignorelli 1717640 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Telling Broadband-Access Stories with Jessica Rosenworcel https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/telling-broadband-access-stories-jessica-rosenworcel <h1 class="article"> Telling Broadband-Access Stories with Jessica Rosenworcel </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Mon, 03/29/2021 - 17:31</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/shapingedu_connecting_for_work_and_learning1_1.png?itok=Jslcw-kZ" width="1224" height="622" alt="Connecting for Work and Learning Project Graphic" title="Broadband Access: Connecting for Work and Learning" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work">connecting for work</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Telling Broadband-Access Stories with Jessica Rosenworcel </h1> </div> <div class="block"> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Stories are at the heart of the developing relationship between </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.fcc.gov/about/overview#:~:text=The%20FCC's%20Mission,of%20Columbia%20and%20U.S.%20territories.">Federal Communications Commission (FCC)</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> Acting Chairwoman </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jessica_Rosenworcel">Jessica Rosenworcel</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and members of the Arizona State University </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/">ShapingEDU</a><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/project/universal-broadband-access-us">“ Connecting for Work and Learning” initiative</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, which was created in May 2020 to foster support for </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_universal_service#:~:text=Broadband%20universal%20service%2C%20also%20known,have%20access%20to%20the%20internet.">universal broadband access</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> throughout the United States for work and learning.</span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-media"> <div class="embedded-media" align="left"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/rosenworcel_jessica-press-photo.jpg?itok=J4Xneh_B" width="1224" height="1530" alt="FCC Acting Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel" title="Jessica Rosenworcel" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <figcaption><span>Jessica Rosenworcel</span></figcaption></figure><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">There is the story of how the relationship initially began taking shape, when ShapingEDU </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/innovators-in-residence">Innovator in Residence</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisagustinelli/">Lisa Gustinelli</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> was among the educators chosen to pose questions about broadband access to Rosenworcel during a </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://youtu.be/SMiRuK7fh5M?t=767">30-minute online question-and-answer session</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> organized as part of the June 2020 </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://futureready.org/who-we-are/">Future Ready Schools’</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://futureready.org/event/technology-leaders-virtual-summit-preparing-for-next-school-year/">K-12 Technology Leaders Virtual Summit</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. Gustinelli, a long-time broadband-access advocate, stayed in touch with Rosenworcel and her staff after that virtual conference, making the commissioner aware of what members of the “Connecting for Work and Learning” initiative were doing to bring broadband-access proponents together to foster positive results.</span></p><p>Then there is the story of how those ongoing exchanges resulted in Rosenworcel agreeing to attend one of the Connecting for Work and Learning <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/Universal-Broadband-Organizing-Committee">organizing committee members’</a> weekly meetings, on March 2, 2021, for <a href="https://youtu.be/mqAKYshg6Qk">a frank, cordial discussion about how committee members can best support FCC efforts to promote universal broadband access throughout the United States.</a></p><p>And, most importantly, there is the response Rosenworcel consistently provided during the time she spent in that March 2 meeting with organizing committee members and others from the ShapingEDU community:</p><p>“I think you are all on the front lines,” she told us. “You are working with educators. You have stories to tell. When I think back to what has been most effective in Washington, a lot of times it’s those stories. We want to know what you’re seeing. How many kids are sitting in a parking lot outside a fast-food restaurant? How many are lingering after hours, at school, because they don’t have the connections at home they need to do their nightly homework?...I just think we have got a lot to learn, in Washington, from those stories that you have, and sharing them with us at the FCC…and sharing them with your state, local, and federally-elected representatives is important. I believe that these kinds of stories are going to make a difference...”</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-media"> <div class="embedded-media" align="right"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/gustinelli_lisa1.jpg?itok=zEvzQZy9" width="200" height="200" alt="Lisa Gustinelli" title="Lisa Gustinelli" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <figcaption><span>Lisa Gustinelli</span></figcaption></figure><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">All of which, of course, appears to indicate that this is a match made in broadband-access heaven because ShapingEDU, among other things, is a community of storytellers. Dreamers, doers, and drivers committed to shaping the future of learning in the digital age—in concrete ways. It’s </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/2020/07/24/learninghuman-virtual-summer-camp-spreading-our-love-wings/">a community that continues to evolve in ways that emphasize action as much as dreaming</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. It is a community that is already well on the path to collecting numerous stories showing how lack of access to the Internet is hurting Americans in their work and lifelong learning efforts, and including stories about broadband-access champions on its </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/project/universal-broadband-access-us">broadband-access project page</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/tag/broadband-access">on its blog</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, through the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://youtu.be/ZXsO-Q5RDB0?t=5"><span style="font-size: 1em;">digital equity and social justice</span></a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> session and others posted on its </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMLoxuounu-CNxIYvxOj-qg">YouTube channel</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, and through highly-interactive webinars  similar to the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/event/developing-telling-stories-broadband-access">“Developing + Telling Stories of Broadband Access”</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> session scheduled for this Wednesday (March 31, 2021) at noon EDT/9 am PDT. And it is a community committed to seeking and supporting solutions to a variety of challenges that affect our ability to function effectively in our work and learning spaces in the digital age.</span></p><p>Access to the Internet and the tools needed to use it effectively for work and learning are clearly a long-standing interest of Rosenworcel’s: “For years, Rosenworcel has talked about the ‘homework gap,’ the term she coined to describe a problem facing communities where kids can’t access the internet because infrastructure is inadequate, their families can’t afford it, or both…” Tanya Basu noted in <a href="https://www.technologyreview.com/2020/10/13/1010243/jessica-rosenworcel-homework-gap-key-to-americas-digital-divide/">an interview with Rosenworcel</a> that she published in <em>MIT Technology Review</em> October 12, 2020. “The more that I talked to teachers, the more I heard the same stories over and over again: Kids sitting in the school parking lot with school laptops they had borrowed late into the evening, trying to peck away at homework because that was the only place they could actually get online. Or kids sitting in fast food restaurants and doing their homework with a side of fries.</p><p>“I looked at the data and found that seven in 10 teachers would assign homework that requires internet access. But FCC data consistently shows that one in three households don’t have broadband access at home. I started calling where those numbers overlap the ‘homework gap’ because I felt that this portion of the digital divide really needed a phrase or a term to describe it because it’s so important.”</p><p>That same passion for the subject—and her belief that positive change is possible—were evident throughout the time with “Connecting for Work and Learning” members.</p><p>“I’m an optimist” she said at the beginning of the session before briefly describing recent accomplishments including <a href="https://www.fcc.gov/broadbandbenefit">congressional approval of $3.2 billion “to set up a program for low-income households to get connected.”</a></p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/fcc-logo.png?itok=AhR1iQvb" width="757" height="211" alt="FCC Logo" title="FCC Logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Acknowledging the $3.2 billion program as one short-term step in the long-term effort to provide universal broadband access throughout the United States, she noted the need to work toward assuring “that every student has the connectivity they need to do their nightly schoolwork” and assuring that “teachers have all the support they need to learn how to use these tools effectively and well.”</span></p><p>And, in a statement that mirrors what “Connecting for Work and Learning” organizing committee members have been saying, Rosenworcel expressed strong support for the idea that having broadband access throughout the country is as important as having access to water and electricity available to everyone in our country regardless of whether they are in urban centers or geographically-isolated rural areas.</p><p>“I think your stories are really, really important, and I want to make sure they are featured prominently in our work, too,” she said as the meeting was drawing to an end. “Let’s stay in touch…You’re like a jolt of positive energy in this pandemic…If I could copy what you’re doing and make sure it’s everywhere, I think we’d be in a good place.”</p><p>Her efforts to solicit stories are continuing with the establishment, on March 22, 2021, of <a href="https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov/hc/en-us/requests/new?ticket_form_id=360001440131">an FCC webpage</a> designed <a href="https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/03/fcc-wants-to-hear-from-americans-whove-been-ignored-by-broadband-industry/">to collect and share stories highlighting the need for access to the Internet and the tools needed to use it effectively.</a></p><p><strong><em>N.B. – For more information about the Connecting for Work and Learning initiative or to become involved, please visit the </em></strong><a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning"><strong><em>project page on the ShapingEDU website</em></strong></a><strong><em> or contact </em></strong><a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/Universal-Broadband-Organizing-Committee"><strong><em>organizing committee members</em></strong></a>.</p> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/jessica-rosenworcel" hreflang="en">jessica rosenworcel</a> <a href="/blog/tag/fcc" hreflang="en">fcc</a> <a href="/blog/tag/federal-communications-commission" hreflang="en">federal communications commission</a> <a href="/blog/tag/lisa-gustinelli" hreflang="en">lisa gustinelli</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-inclusion" hreflang="en">digital inclusion</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-equity" hreflang="en">digital equity</a> <a href="/blog/tag/homework-gap" hreflang="en">homework gap</a> <a href="/blog/tag/future-ready-schools" hreflang="en">future ready schools</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 30 Mar 2021 00:31:01 +0000 psignorelli 1629900 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Gina Millsap: Broadband Avenger https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/gina-millsap-broadband-avenger <h1 class="article"> Gina Millsap: Broadband Avenger </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Tue, 03/23/2021 - 11:28</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu-broadband_access-logo2.png?itok=KClniDPC" width="1224" height="689" alt="ShapingEDU Connecting for Work and Learning Graphic" title="ShapingEDU Connecting for Work + Learning" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work">connecting for work</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Gina Millsap: Broadband Avenger </h1> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/gina-millsap" hreflang="en">gina millsap</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/collaboration" hreflang="en">collaboration</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-inclusion" hreflang="en">digital inclusion</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-equity" hreflang="en">digital equity</a> <a href="/blog/tag/topeka-and-shawnee-county-public-library" hreflang="en">topeka and shawnee county public library</a> <a href="/blog/tag/tscpl" hreflang="en">tscpl</a> <a href="/blog/tag/coin" hreflang="en">coin</a> <a href="/blog/tag/columbia-online-information-network" hreflang="en">columbia online information network</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-literacy" hreflang="en">digital literacy</a> <a href="/blog/tag/shlb" hreflang="en">shlb</a> <a href="/blog/tag/shcools-health-and-libraries-broadband-coalition" hreflang="en">shcools health and libraries broadband coalition</a> <a href="/blog/tag/urban-libraries-council" hreflang="en">urban libraries council</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-equity-action-team" hreflang="en">digital equity action team</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-avenger" hreflang="en">broadband avenger</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 23 Mar 2021 18:28:09 +0000 psignorelli 1614896 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 2 of 2) https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/beth-holland-barriers-challenges-and-empathy-fostering-broadband-access-part-2-2 <h1 class="article"> Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 2 of 2) </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Thu, 02/11/2021 - 18:44</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/shapingedu_connecting_for_work_and_learning1.png?itok=5eCIEPcu" width="1224" height="622" alt="Graphic image for ShapingEDU &quot;Connecting for Work and Learning&quot; broadband-access initiative" title="ShapingEDU &quot;Connecting for Work and Learning&quot; broadband-access initiative" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work">connecting for work</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 2 of 2) </h1> </div> <div class="block"> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">What we do with </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_universal_service">universal broadband-access</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> is clearly as important as the efforts we are making, though the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/home">ShapingEDU</a><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">“Connecting for Work and Learning”</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> initiative, to foster that level of access—a theme consistently present during the interview I did recently with </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.edutopia.org/profile/beth-holland">Dr. Beth Holland</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, Partner at </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://learningaccelerator.org/">The Learning Accelerator</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and Digital Equity Advisor to </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/about-cosn">CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking)</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, for the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog">ShapingEDU blog</a>.</p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/common_sense-looking_back_looking_forward-digital_divide-cover.png?itok=_ynGGZnr" width="513" height="655" alt="Looking Back, Looking Forward: K-12 Digital Divide report" title="Looking Back, Looking Forward: K-12 Digital Divide report" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p> </p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Too many assumptions get made about whether access in itself will solve the issues,” she suggested. “However, we have to remember the diversity of this country. It’s going to be very different depending on the culture and context of each community. I was just reading a new report [</span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.bcg.com/en-us/press/27january2021-digital-divide-narrowed-must-close-eliminate-risks-students-economy"><em>Looking Back, Looking Forward: What It Will Take to Permanently Close the K-12 Digital Divide</em></a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, January 27, 2021] this morning from </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.commonsensemedia.org/about-us/our-mission">Common Sense</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.bcg.com/en-us/about/about-bcg/overview">BCG [Boston Consulting Group]</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. They touch on this idea that a barrier to adoption could be more cognitive than financial or geographic/physical (e.g., no service). </span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Another point: Have you seen </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.nyu.edu/about/leadership-university-administration/office-of-the-president/office-of-the-provost/faculty-affairs/charlton-mcilwain.html">Dr. Charlton McIlwain’s</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> book on </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/black-software-9780190863845?cc=us&amp;lang=en&amp;"><em>Black Software: The Internet &amp; Racial Justice, from the AfroNet to Black Lives Matter</em></a><em style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">,</em><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> or </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S._Craig_Watkins">Dr. S. Craig Watkins’</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> work in </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://nyupress.org/9781479854110/the-digital-edge/"><em>The Digital Edge: How Black and Latino Youth Navigate Digital Inequality</em></a><em style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">?</em><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> Both of them, in different ways, touch on the white narrative surrounding technology adoption. Particularly for non-white communities, adoption could look different. Universal access needs to be considered from a more universal perspective, and all voices need to be honored and valued in designing solutions (e.g., stop saying that underserved communities could get served with refurbished devices that the white/affluent community doesn’t want.).”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">It's a theme that consistently flows through her writing, including her CoSN article </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/blog/digital-equity-isn%E2%80%99t-just-about-equal-access-technology#:~:text=Digital%20Equity%20isn't%20just%20about%20Equal%20Access%20to%20Technology,-Beth%20Holland%2C%20EdD&amp;text=By%20focusing%20on%20how%20technology,for%20system%2Dwide%20school%20improvement.">“Digital Equity Isn’t Just About Equal Access to Technology”</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> (July 11, 2019), which includes a summary of what she saw happening in the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.k12albemarle.org/">Albemarle County [Virginia] Public Schools</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">: “From the start, the district recognized that the most critical component of Digital Equity may be whether or not the students and teachers possess the literacy to take advantage of the available tools….Beyond just installing software, the district has also created a multi-tiered support system that includes coaching and professional development for both students and teachers. Additionally, teachers as well as middle and high school students have administrative control over their laptops so that they can customize their devices to best meet their individual needs. The technology department recognizes that without this opportunity to develop these digital literacy skills, teachers and students will not be able to take advantage of the technology to improve their own learning.”</span></p> <div class="embedded-media" driving="" k-12="" innovation="" report=""> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/cosn-driving_k-12_innovation-20211.png?itok=SNxRQ28i" width="333" height="446" alt="CoSN " title="CoSN &quot;Driving K-12 Innovation report" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p> </p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Digital equity is a theme that also receives abundant attention in CoSN’s recently-released </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://cosn.org/k12innovation/hurdles-accelerators">“Driving K-12 Innovation: 2021 Hurdles + Accelerators”</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> report, where it is seen as one of the top three hurdles to innovation in K-12 learning. The writers of the report cite data cost, access to digital devices as well as to the Internet itself, limited tech literacy among the parents of some of our K-12 learners, and the challenges parents face in facilitating online learning while those same parents are attempting to work and take care of their children.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“This comes back to the empathy comment that you made earlier: any solution really needs to consider the context and community. What needs to happen beyond access and digital literacy to also address broader issues of media literacy and even algorithmic literacy? I’ve been thinking about the issues of Pandora’s box. We can open it and let things out, but if we haven’t considered the potential unintended consequences of throwing out access without helping students and adults fully develop an understanding of the implications and connotations, then the potential exists to further inequity and not address it. The </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.digitalinclusion.org/">NDIA [National Digital Inclusion Alliance]</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> has been having this conversation a lot lately, and I think that it’s an important one.” </span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">All of which brings us back to a key point of the conversation we had: what can those interested in fostering universal broadband access for work and learning do?</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Nationally, there needs to be policy changes to make broadband access seen as a public good—like electricity or water,” she suggests. “There also needs to be funding to support both school and home access for students….Regionally, I guess this is tricky because regions are so diverse in this country. A lot of states have regional education groups. A big thing to consider is how regional groups can band together to have more collective bargaining power….Locally, I think it’s important to be aware of who does/doesn’t have access. Teachers may either over/under estimate the amount of connectivity that their students have. </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/matt-hiefield-36391352/">Matthew Hiefield</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, from Beaverton, Oregon, helped me write </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/blog/five-opportunities-tackle-digital-equity-start-school-year">a post a while ago about questions to ask students</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/tchristie/">Teshon Christie</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> in Kent, Washington made a great point about not only assuming students have access, but [about] the danger of assuming that they don’t. He’s found that some families prioritize access while others may not. His district has been very deliberate about finding out who needs support from the district instead of using a general metric like free or reduced-price lunch to drive assumptions.”</span></p><p><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em>N.B. – 1)  For more information about the Connecting for Work and Learning initiative or to become involved, please visit the <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">project page on the ShapingEDU website</a> or contact <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/Universal-Broadband-Organizing-Committee">organizing committee members</a></em></strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">.</span><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em> 2) <strong>For a lightly-edited transcript of Paul’s interview with Holland, please visit his <a href="https://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/?s=Promoting+Universal+Broadband+Access+With+Beth+Holland+%28Part">Building Creative Bridges</a> blog.</strong></em></strong></p> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/beth-holland" hreflang="en">beth holland</a> <a href="/blog/tag/cosn" hreflang="en">cosn</a> <a href="/blog/tag/driving-k-12-innovation" hreflang="en">Driving K-12 Innovation</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/collaboration" hreflang="en">collaboration</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-inclusion" hreflang="en">digital inclusion</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-equity" hreflang="en">digital equity</a> <a href="/blog/tag/looking-back-looking-forward" hreflang="en">looking back looking forward</a> <a href="/blog/tag/common-sense" hreflang="en">common sense</a> <a href="/blog/tag/bcg" hreflang="en">bcg</a> <a href="/blog/tag/boston-consulting-group" hreflang="en">boston consulting group</a> <a href="/blog/tag/charlton-mcilwain" hreflang="en">charlton mcilwain</a> <a href="/blog/tag/black-software" hreflang="en">black software</a> <a href="/blog/tag/craig-watkins" hreflang="en">craig watkins</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-edge" hreflang="en">digital edge</a> <a href="/blog/tag/albemarle-county-public-schools" hreflang="en">albemarle county public schools</a> <a href="/blog/tag/ndia" hreflang="en">ndia</a> <a href="/blog/tag/national-digital-inclusion-alliance" hreflang="en">national digital inclusion alliance</a> <a href="/blog/tag/matthew-hiefield" hreflang="en">matthew hiefield</a> <a href="/blog/tag/teshon-christie" hreflang="en">teshon christie</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 12 Feb 2021 01:44:00 +0000 psignorelli 1519773 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 1 of 2) https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/beth-holland-barriers-challenges-and-empathy-fostering-broadband-access-part-1-2 <h1 class="article"> Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 1 of 2) </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Thu, 02/11/2021 - 18:29</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu-universal_broadband1.png?itok=i_bd1whL" width="300" height="387" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work">connecting for work</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 1 of 2) </h1> </div> <div class="block"> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">A story that has become painfully familiar as the coronavirus pandemic has raged around us: without adequate Internet access, we are severely limited in our ability to work and learn effectively. A story that is not so obvious: any successful effort to create </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_universal_service">universal broadband access</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> throughout the United States is going to have to be accompanied by efforts to foster </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.digitalinclusion.org/definitions/#:~:text=Digital%20Equity,our%20society%2C%20democracy%20and%20economy.">digital equity and digital inclusion</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> in numerous ways—a conclusion that became more clear to me than ever before as I conducted an online interview recently, for the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog">ShapingEDU blog</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, with </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.edutopia.org/profile/beth-holland">Dr. Beth Holland</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, Partner at </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://learningaccelerator.org/">The Learning Accelerator</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and Digital Equity Advisor to </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/about-cosn">CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking)</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">.</span> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-media"> <div class="embedded-media" align="left"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/holland_beth1_0.jpg?itok=LJlV_FYl" width="719" height="1080" alt="Beth Holland" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <figcaption><span>Beth Holland</span></figcaption></figure><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Simply getting [universal broadband] access does not solve the problem [of digital equity],” she observed during a conversation that weaved back and forth between focusing on the barriers we face to creating universal broadband access and the challenges we face in trying to equitably use that access to support work and learning. “It’s going to continue to morph as technologies change.” </span></p><p>An often-overlooked theme that emerged overall was how important empathy is going to be in any successful effort to provide universal broadband access. Both of us acknowledged, as we were looking at who has access and who doesn’t—as well as how that access is used in work and learning environments—that fostering empathy for those without access and support can be a critically important part of any effort to extend access and nurture equity and inclusion. </p><p>“I am going to admit my privilege here,” she said. “Where I am geographically located, I have full cell service and access to high-speed Internet. I’ve had a laptop, plus numerous other devices, since the late 1990s. However, I think the real wakeup call has happened in a few different instances. First, my husband and I like to do a lot of hiking. When we drive places, I’ve become incredibly attuned to whether or not we have cell service—not because I want to be online, but because I’m trying to get a sense of the magnitude of the disparity of access in a tangible way. We drove from Salt Lake City to Escalante National Park a few years ago, and I counted miles between cell signals and any place of business that might possibly offer Wi-Fi to kids. It made me realize how some possible solutions to the digital divide really aren’t feasible. Last fall, we were driving in rural New Hampshire with no signal. At one point, a Dollar Store was the only major business, and it was about 30 minutes to find a gas station. I saw satellite dishes in yards, so I am guessing there was no cable. I was thinking about conditions of schools and the feasibility of getting access. It made me very aware of the need for policymakers to take a ride and recognize the challenge that so many are facing right now to get access.” </p><p>An updated rallying cry for those without inadequate access might, in fact, be “take a ride with us” rather than “walk in our boots,” for the act of taking that ride—as Holland and other colleagues have done—hammers home the impact inadequate broadband access has on people not only distant from us but in our own geographical backyards.</p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu-universal_broadband1.png?itok=i_bd1whL" width="300" height="387" alt="ShapingEDU universal broadband initiative image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“A few years ago, I was doing research in pre-schools as part of my post-doc. I got a text message on my phone that there was a new message in the medical portal from my doctor. The portal didn’t work on a mobile device, so I logged in when I got home (privileges #1-3: cell signal, home Internet, and a computer). Apparently, I was at high-risk for measles, and there were ongoing outbreaks at the time. I could schedule an appointment for a blood test to see if my vaccine was still good. Turns out that it wasn’t, and I needed a new vaccine from CVS. Everything was coordinated through the portal and took no time, but what about the person who didn’t know to sign up for the portal, who couldn’t access it, and who might not have the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_literacy">digital-literacy</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> skills to navigate it? Understanding all of this has made me hyperaware of the digital-equity challenges—not just in terms of physical access, but also the necessary skills behind having that access.”</span></p><p>First, of course, we need to work together at the big, dreamy level our predecessors did they they created a national postal service to meet communication needs; when they worked to create a telephone system that further enhanced our ability to engage in effective communication; and when they united at the national level to provide electricity throughout the entire country. That’s where the organizers of the <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/home">ShapingEDU</a> <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">“Connecting for Work and Learning: Universal Broadband Access in the United States”</a> initiative has been focusing since its inception in May 2020 to connect and support existing groups and interested individuals.</p><p>Some of the barriers that are easily identifiable include cost, geography, and competing/conflicting interests among some key stakeholders.</p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“I think the first part is to be really aware of geography and whether or not infrastructure is possible,” Holland said. “In urban/suburban areas where the barrier is more often cost, then it’s a matter of creating affordable </span><em style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">high-speed </em><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">options. (There are lots of complaints that low-cost broadband isn’t enough bandwidth to do anything meaningful.) Solutions here could be allowing E-Rate to offset the cost for qualifying families, or working with housing authorities, communities, and anchor institutions to create more affordable solutions. A great example is Boulder Valley, in Colorado. </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://digitalbridgek12.org/toolkit/deploy/boulder-valley/">The district created a public-private partnership with a local ISP</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. The company put </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fl9-VLhFtQ4">towers on top of the schools to broadcast Internet, and families in need could then get access for free.</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> There’s a profit-sharing agreement as well.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“It gets trickier when the geography comes into play. In </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/blog/addressing-homework-gap-through-public-private-partnerships">a blog post [describing the Boulder Valley project]</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, a district in upstate New York [is mentioned because it] created a “neighbor-to-neighbor” network to connect kids. The </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_service_provider">ISP</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> said that they could not afford to run cable to many houses because they are so far apart from each other. Instead, the district got a grant to find houses with connections and then put antennas on top of barns/grain silos/roofs. They could then broadcast Wi-Fi for up to five miles from one house to another. </span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Hotspots can be any option when there is cell service, and some districts such as </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.pcmag.com/news/spacexs-starlink-to-supply-free-satellite-internet-to-families-in-texas">Ector County in Texas</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> have started experimenting with satellite connections for really rural locations. </span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Finally, some districts have come up with ways to create their own LTE/5G networks. </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHBD_enUS896US897&amp;ei=9WIcYJDTBsys0PEPn_27iAw&amp;q=school+district+install+internet+tower&amp;oq=school+district+install+internet+tower&amp;gs_lcp=CgZwc3ktYWIQAzIFCCEQoAEyBQghEKABOgcIABBHELADOgQIIRAKOgUIIRCrAlD4PlinlQFgo5sBaAFwAngAgAGnAogBniSSAQY2LjIyLjSYAQCgAQGqAQdnd3Mtd2l6yAEIwAEB&amp;sclient=psy-ab&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjQoeKnktHuAhVMFjQIHZ_-DsEQ4dUDCA0&amp;uact=5">They install towers around the community and can then provide Internet to their families</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. Michigan has a big project in partnership with Northern Michigan University and the surrounding K-12 districts. Green Bay, Wisconsin did this, and there are others,” she noted.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Another barrier to be overcome is our view of what Internet service actually is—a commodity, a service, a public good, or something else: “Currently, internet is considered a service and not a utility. Therefore, that’s how it’s regulated. There really isn’t the financial incentive or pressure to run broadband to every community—especially the hard-to-reach ones. There are some advocates calling for internet to become a utility so that the country can be wired in a fashion similar to the electrification project in the 1930s. Finally, and this is tied to regulation, we really have to remember cost. Even low-cost options could be too much for a family to afford. The argument can be made for internet to be considered as part of the life-line program that ensures phone access as a matter of public safety…. Nationally, there needs to be policy changes to make broadband access seen as a public good—like electricity or water. There also needs to be funding to support both school and home access for students.”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Once we do overcome those barriers and move steadily closer to examining the challenges of inclusion and equity, we begin to tackle some of the related issues requiring our attention—as we’ll see in the second of these two interrelated articles.</span></p><p><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em>N.B. – 1)  For more information about the Connecting for Work and Learning initiative or to become involved, please visit the <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">project page on the ShapingEDU website</a> or contact <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/Universal-Broadband-Organizing-Committee">organizing committee members</a></em></strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">.</span><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em> 2) <strong>For a lightly-edited transcript of Paul’s interview with Holland, please visit his <a href="https://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/?s=Promoting+Universal+Broadband+Access+With+Beth+Holland+%28Part">Building Creative Bridges</a> blog.</strong></em></strong></p> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/beth-holland" hreflang="en">beth holland</a> <a href="/blog/tag/cosn" hreflang="en">cosn</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/collaboration" hreflang="en">collaboration</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-inclusion" hreflang="en">digital inclusion</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-equity" hreflang="en">digital equity</a> <a href="/blog/tag/boulder-valley-school-district" hreflang="en">boulder valley school district</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 12 Feb 2021 01:29:02 +0000 psignorelli 1519772 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Lev Gonick on Universal Broadband Access: If Not Now, When? https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/lev-gonick-universal-broadband-access-if-not-now-when <h1 class="article"> Lev Gonick on Universal Broadband Access: If Not Now, When? </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Fri, 12/11/2020 - 10:12</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu_connecting_for_work_and_learning1.png?itok=JzZwrHx0" width="1224" height="622" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work">connecting for work</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Lev Gonick on Universal Broadband Access: If Not Now, When? </h1> </div> <div class="block"> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> </span>“2020, for all the tragedy of COVID and the toll of human life and collective anxiety, is the year that <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_universal_service">universal broadband access</a> moved from being a quixotic call in the wild to a near table stakes reality, especially for education needs,” Arizona State University (ASU) Chief Information Officer <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/levgonick/">Lev Gonick</a> observed during a recent interview for the ASU <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/">ShapingEDU</a> <em><a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog">Reshaping Learning</a></em> blog.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-media"> <div class="embedded-media" align="right"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/gonick-lev1.jpg?itok=T1AACLdu" width="1224" height="689" alt="Lev Gonick photo" title="Lev Gonick" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <figcaption><span>Lev Gonick</span></figcaption></figure><p> </p><p>“At ASU itself,” he continued, “we have provided thousands of laptop and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hotspot_(Wi-Fi)">hotspot</a> loaners to students in need, including hundreds of students from American Indian reservations in rural Arizona. We have also worked to develop a coalition of partners working on <a href="https://www.govtech.com/civic/The-Quest-for-Digital-Equity.html">digital equity</a> including incumbent providers, new entrants, community anchor institutions like the State Library, healthcare organizations, K-12 school districts, the Maricopa Community Colleges and, of course, the remarkable breadth of talent across ASU itself. We have also worked with key education broadband network organizations, like the <a href="https://suncorridornet.org/about-us">Sun Corridor Network</a> [where Gonick serves as director of its governing board], which provides network connectivity to universities, colleges, and schools across the state. Recently, we started working with cities and the State government to align policy objectives to integrated network architectures to the priorities and needs of the community, as the community itself has articulated. What took a decade in Northeast Ohio is happening here in Arizona in under a year.</p><p>“The big difference is COVID-19 and the realization that broadband being provided to advance remote K-20 learners across the state, especially in our inner cities and rural communities, can also be used for health and wellness needs, next generation workforce development and skills, business attraction, and economic development. That has always been the promise. Now we are seeing the coalition coming together in unprecedented fashion. ASU is a strong and capable partner, and we are advancing the needs of Arizona in alignment with our mission.”</p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/gonick-lev2.jpg?itok=LKLentld" width="326" height="182" alt="Photo of Lev Gonick" title="Lev Gonick" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p> </p><p>Gonick’s involvement in and activism on behalf of education and technology extends over a period of more than three decades, as <a href="https://www.ascilite.org/conferences/sydney10/Lev%20Gonick%20Bio.htm">a brief biographical note</a> for one of his conference presentations confirms. While serving as vice president for Information Technology Services and Chief Information Officer at Case Western Reserve University (in Cleveland), he was named one of the “Top 25 Doers, Dreamers &amp; Drivers in Public-Sector Innovation” and one of “10 Difference Makers” by <em>Crain’s Cleveland Business</em>. He has served as president of the Board of the New Media Consortium; co-chair of the Cisco Higher Ed Executive Exchange; and a consultant to more than 40 universities and colleges in the United States and Canada as well as serving as a presenter at educational and technology conferences around the world.</p><p>He recalls being drawn initially to efforts to foster Internet access in the 1980s: “In 1987, I helped my friend <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/rob-borland-2b490834/?originalSubdomain=zw">Rob Borland</a> from the University of Zimbabwe establish MangoNet, an early <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FidoNet">FidoNet</a> network in Southern Africa providing connectivity to rural healthcare providers in Zimbabwe through <a href="https://www.greennet.org.uk/about">GreenNet</a> and WorkNet—all part of the pre-commercialization of the Internet. My wife and I managed to bring in 1440 baud modems which were installed at the Swiss Embassy in Harare. For four years, from 1990-1993), I took a group of students from across Canada and the United States to Zimbabwe for intensive study and non-governmental experiences. We continued our work with MangoNet, which eventually became HealthNet. Thereafter, I realized how important connectivity was both for health and wellness, as we were working on the detection of tuberculosis (TB) as an early indication of AIDS, but also AIDs education using early Internet protocols. When I started working in California in 1995, I took my learnings from Africa and began thinking and working on connecting parts of Pomona, which were on the “wrong side of the tracks,” with poverty, low education attainment, deteriorating public housing and little to no Internet. That marked the beginning of my 25-year effort to contribute to Connecting the Unconnected.”</p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/shapingedu_logo_2.png?itok=_LUmmVET" width="1224" height="622" alt="ShapingEDU logo" title="ShapingEDU logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p> </p><p>The most important lesson learned from those initial interactions with Borland was “the importance of designing and building coalitions of the willing,” he recalls—an effort that has extended over a decade-long period of time through BroadBand Properties and the annual Broadband Communities Summit, and that continues to this day through numerous endeavors, including his work with the Arizona State University <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/">ShapingEDU</a> community he helped establish in 2018 for dreamers, doers, and drivers shaping the future of learning in the digital age.</p><p>“Before there was Broadband Communities, the same collection of national leaders were organized under the name BroadBand Properties,” he recalls. “They generously awarded me <a href="http://www.bbpmag.com/2010s/10awards.php">a national recognition for our community vision of connecting the community in Northeast Ohio in 2011</a>. Thereafter, I was invited to share some of our work at the annual meetings and met a number of broadband leaders who were working on what would become known as the <a href="https://www.fcc.gov/general/national-broadband-plan">National Broadband Plan</a> and the National Broadband Coalition. I had an opportunity to support both efforts through my experience at Case Western Reserve and our work at OneCommunity, which later became <a href="http://www.digitalc.org/">DigitalC</a> [an ongoing project in Cleveland].</p><p>“<a href="https://www.bbcmag.com/bios/baller-jim">Jim Baller</a>, one of the nation’s foremost legal authorities on broadband, has convened a ‘blue ribbon’ panel each year on Economic Development at the Broadband Communities conference for at least the last eight or so years. I have had the pleasure of being the moderator for that panel for most of those sessions. The topics typically include a review of where we’ve come from over the past year, and the opportunities and challenges ahead. This past year, as we were remote, Jim chaired the panel and I was happy to share some of the great work that we are doing at Arizona State University (ASU) on economic development and educational attainment by leveraging community networking partnerships.”</p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/shapingedu_connecting_for_work_and_learning1_1.png?itok=Jslcw-kZ" width="1224" height="622" alt="Connecting for Work and Learning Project Graphic" title="Broadband Access: Connecting for Work and Learning" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p> </p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">The rapidly-growing ASU ShapingEDU community of practice (and action) has, during its first three years of operation, quickly evolved. Starting as a global community of educators and learners trying to imagine and foster positive change in lifelong learning, it is, through its </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/innovators-in-residence">Innovators in Residence</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/storytellers-in-residence">Storytellers in Residence</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> programs, increasingly fostering global collaborations centered around a variety of contemporary social issues, including the social justice aspects of providing broadband access for work and learning throughout the United States, including broadband access.</span></p><p>As the current pandemic has led to unexpected and rapid shifts in the way students in academic and work settings are learning, ShapingEDU community members have responded in a variety of ways, including creation, in May 2020, of the ShapingEDU <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">“Connecting for Work and Learning”</a> initiative.</p><p>“There is a role for everyone interested in and committed to broadband equity,” Gonick says. “There are personal and organizational investments of not only cash, but also equipment, policy and community coalition building, legal work, broadening an understanding of community needs and, of course, volunteering to support the orientation to and education of the more than 30 percent of Americans who do not have access to nor use the Internet. Something for everyone. The regional and national angle is about identifying existing forces working to address access, equity, adoption, and use and supporting them, whether those are libraries, community centers, the national coalition digital inclusion and so forth.”</p><p>And, in terms of his own sense of optimism that long-term efforts to create universal broadband access throughout the United States may finally be within reach, he asks and says “If not now, when? If not us, who? This is our time and our calling. There is strong non-partisan support across most (but not all) of the actors from policy to providers, to community interests. I am bullish that we will see significant progress in the next calendar year.”</p><p>For more information about ShapingEDU and what community members are doing to shape the future of learning in the digital age, please visit the <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/home">community website.</a></p><p><strong><em>–A lightly-edited transcript of Paul’s interview with Lev Gonick is on Paul’s <a href="https://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/?s=+a+two-part+interview+conducted+with+Lev+Gonick">Building Creative Bridges</a> blog. </em></strong></p> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/arlene-krebs" hreflang="en">arlene krebs</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-communities-summit" hreflang="en">broadband communities summit</a> <a href="/blog/tag/collaboration" hreflang="en">collaboration</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digitalc" hreflang="en">digitalc</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-divide" hreflang="en">digital divide</a> <a href="/blog/tag/jim-baller" hreflang="en">jim baller</a> <a href="/blog/tag/learning" hreflang="en">learning</a> <a href="/blog/tag/lev-gonick" hreflang="en">lev gonick</a> <a href="/blog/tag/national-broadband-plan" hreflang="en">national broadband plan</a> <a href="/blog/tag/onecommunity" hreflang="en">onecommunity</a> <a href="/blog/tag/rob-borland" hreflang="en">rob borland</a> <a href="/blog/tag/social-justice" hreflang="en">social justice</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 11 Dec 2020 17:12:00 +0000 psignorelli 1370549 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Dianne Connery: Broadband Internet Access, Communities, Fundraising, and Libraries https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/dianne-connery-broadband-internet-access-communities-fundraising-and-libraries <h1 class="article"> Dianne Connery: Broadband Internet Access, Communities, Fundraising, and Libraries </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Thu, 10/08/2020 - 11:16</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/branson-broadband_and_rural_libraries_0.jpg?itok=w6qd6DhU" width="1224" height="918" alt="Connecting Our Communities illustration by Karina Branson/ConverSketch" title="Connecting Our Communities" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work">connecting for work</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Dianne Connery: Broadband Internet Access, Communities, Fundraising, and Libraries </h1> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connected-nation" hreflang="en">connected nation</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/dianne-connery" hreflang="en">dianne connery</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-divide" hreflang="en">digital divide</a> <a href="/blog/tag/fundraising" hreflang="en">fundraising</a> <a href="/blog/tag/hotspots" hreflang="en">hotspots</a> <a href="/blog/tag/information-technology-disaster-resource-center" hreflang="en">information technology disaster resource center</a> <a href="/blog/tag/itdrc" hreflang="en">itdrc</a> <a href="/blog/tag/learning" hreflang="en">learning</a> <a href="/blog/tag/libraries" hreflang="en">libraries</a> <a href="/blog/tag/pottsboro-area-library" hreflang="en">pottsboro area library</a> <a href="/blog/tag/pottsboro-library" hreflang="en">pottsboro library</a> <a href="/blog/tag/schools-health-and-libraries-broadband-coalition" hreflang="en">schools health and libraries broadband coalition</a> <a href="/blog/tag/tekwav" hreflang="en">tekwav</a> <a href="/blog/tag/texas-rural-funders" hreflang="en">texas rural funders</a> <a href="/blog/tag/wi-fi" hreflang="en">wi-fi</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 08 Oct 2020 18:16:40 +0000 psignorelli 1220914 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Arlene Krebs: Broadband Internet Access, Learning, and Social Justice https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/arlene-krebs-broadband-internet-access-learning-and-social-justice <h1 class="article"> Arlene Krebs: Broadband Internet Access, Learning, and Social Justice </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Tue, 09/08/2020 - 13:30</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/conversketch_learninghuman_2020_day_4_campfire_social_justice.jpg?itok=aK0SbI6g" width="1224" height="689" alt="Drawing of key ideas from the session -- Campfire: Social Justice. Digital Education and Tribal Rights" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work">connecting for work</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Arlene Krebs: Broadband Internet Access, Learning, and Social Justice </h1> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/arlene-krebs" hreflang="en">arlene krebs</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/central-coast-broadband-consortium" hreflang="en">central coast broadband consortium</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-divide" hreflang="en">digital divide</a> <a href="/blog/tag/learning" hreflang="en">learning</a> <a href="/blog/tag/loaves-fishes-computers" hreflang="en">loaves fishes &amp; computers</a> <a href="/blog/tag/national-broadband-plan" hreflang="en">national broadband plan</a> <a href="/blog/tag/social-justice" hreflang="en">social justice</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 08 Sep 2020 20:30:00 +0000 psignorelli 1150099 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu