beth holland https://shapingedu.asu.edu/ en Broadband Access for Connecting Work & Learning: One Year Later https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/broadband-access-connecting-work-learning-one-year-later <h1 class="article"> Broadband Access for Connecting Work &amp; Learning: One Year Later </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Mon, 05/24/2021 - 16:14</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu-broadband_access-logo2_1.png?itok=EMmTfZ1V" width="1224" height="689" alt="ShapingEDU &quot;Connecting for Work + Learning&quot; Graphic" title="ShapingEDU: Broadband-Access initiative" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/beth-holland">beth holland</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Broadband Access for Connecting Work &amp; Learning: One Year Later </h1> </div> <div class="block"> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">The whole world seemed to be shutting down in May 2020. The spread of the coronavirus during the first months of the year, combined with efforts to avoid face-to-face contact as much as possible, had pushed many of us even further online than we already had (willingly) gone—including in the field of teaching-training-learning. Within the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/about">ShapingEDU community</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, we were doing our best to respond positively to the challenges produced by the pandemic, and some of us were even beginning to discuss what we, as a community of dreamers, doers, and drivers shaping the future of learning in the digital age, could do that would be positive and actionable.</span></p><p> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25JPT_sXa2U&amp;t=8s"><img class="media-element file-default" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Connecting for Work + Learning -- Online Workshop" src="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/sites/default/files/styles/panopoly_image_original/public/shapingedu-broadband_access_online_session-march_2021.png?itok=L9KYoZJy" alt="Link to ShapingEDU Broadband Access Webinar" width="565" height="348" data-delta="1" data-fid="34924" data-media-element="1" /></a></p><p>Near the end of the monthly meeting of community leaders that month, we were identifying some of the challenges—those <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicked_problem">wicked problems</a> that, by definition, seem to evolve so quickly that any proposed solution fails to deal with the problem by the time we are able to get around to implementing that solution—and turned our attention to <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2021/02/04/covid-online-school-broadband-internet-laptops/3930744001/">the terrible problems learners (and educators) were facing because they had inadequate—or no—Internet access in an environment where learning had gone online</a>.   </p><p>For some of us, Internet access and, more specifically, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband">broadband access</a> had long been an issue of great concern—and one that never seemed to gain traction. And we know that <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_universal_service">some countries—including Switzerland, Finland, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Botswana—provide universal broadband service</a>. But with learners (and employees) all over the United States making their way into numerous media reports as <a href="https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/05/08/parking-lot-wi-fi-way-life-many-students">they parked outside libraries, or retail businesses to gain the Internet access they didn’t have at home</a>, the topic was suddenly hot. Very hot. Which made a few of us in ShapingEDU wonder aloud, during that brief conversation, whether “the right to bear Internet” was finally something that was becoming significant enough to actually be able to attract long-term support and, more importantly, inspire the collaborations necessary to produce something as ambitiously dreamy as universal broadband access throughout the United States.</p><p><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqAKYshg6Qk&amp;t=11s"> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/shapingedu-broadband_access-jessica_rosenworcel.png?itok=o-qAbpwl" width="1173" height="790" alt="Inteview with Acting FCC Chair Jessica Rosenworcel" title="Jessica Rosenworcel Interview" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> </a><br /> With a combination of trepidation—<em>Really? You want us to tackle something else even though we’re struggling to complete what we have already undertaken?</em>—and an equal amount of hope that this was a quest worth pursuing, we agreed to see whether <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/Universal-Broadband-Organizing-Committee">this particular group of dreamer-doer-drivers</a> could find a significant role to play and, in the process, make meaningful contributions in the pursuit of universal broadband access. </p><p>The results have been—in what is admittedly the first year of what is likely to be a multi-year effort—encouraging both in terms of what we set out to do and in terms of the contributions the project has made to the way the ShapingEDU community undertakes projects (e.g., weekly rather than monthly meetings for projects, an ever-growing organizing committee that draws new people into the community, more directly working as advocates than we previously had worked within this particular community, connecting our work, through participation in online conferences, to the work done in other communities, and connecting our efforts to other projects and initiatives within the overall ShapingEDU community). </p><p>In terms of contributing to support for step-by-step implementation of universal broadband access, the <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/project/universal-broadband-access-us">“Connecting for Work and Learning: Universal Broadband Access in the U.S.”</a> group set out not to start from scratch but, rather, to see if from its strength as a global community of educators, trainers, writers, storytellers, and consultants, it could bring together various players to combine efforts as broadband advocates. We hoped we would attract members of our community to be part of the weekly action-oriented meetings we were scheduling; we had no idea, in May 2020, that among those who would be attracted to some of those meetings would be Acting FCC Chair <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqAKYshg6Qk&amp;t=65s">Jessica Rosenworcel</a> (March 2, 2021), FCC Chief of the Consumer Affairs and Outreach Division <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/conversation-lyle-ishida-chief-consumer-affairs-and-outreach-division-federal-communications">Lyle Ishida</a> (May 4, 2021), broadband-access advocates <a href="https://youtu.be/fAtYo1G0CwM">Mark Goldstein and Steve Peters</a> (May 11, 2021), and many others who have become regular participants in the conversations. Nor did we expect to produce online events that remain available as learning and advocacy resources through the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%22shapingedu+community%22+broadband">ShapingEDU community YouTube channel</a>.</p><p> <a href="https://linkedin.zoom.us/rec/share/afIrZ1bMMv_LSq0YbY2JLEwQm1NO75Xs-dmhdVd79YgawwwtRg-HUl6jWceimjFk.nkwzlxH7TOHHvZbO"> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/shapingedu-linkedin_learning_broadband_access_session-march_2021.png?itok=1BhXnv-J" width="730" height="308" alt="LinkedIn Learning Broadband Access Session" title="&quot;Promoting Broadband Access&quot; Session Through LinkedIn Learning" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> </a></p><p>We also did not, in May 2020, realize that among the educational and advocacy efforts we could make would be an ongoing series of <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/tag/broadband-access">interviews with longtime broadband advocates</a> whose stories document the challenges and offer inspiration to others interested in finding ways to join the fight for universal broadband access: advocates including “Broadband Champion” <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/arlene-krebs-broadband-internet-access-learning-and-social-justice">Arlene Krebs</a>, rural librarian <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/dianne-connery-broadband-internet-access-communities-fundraising-and-libraries">Dianne Connery</a>, Arizona State University Chief Information Office <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/lev-gonick-universal-broadband-access-if-not-now-when">Lev Gonick</a>, <a href="https://www.cosn.org/about-cosn">CoSN (Consortium for School Networking)</a> Digital Equity Advisor <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/tag/beth-holland">Beth Holland</a>, and “Broadband Avenger” <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/gina-millsap-broadband-avenger">Gina Millsap</a>. </p><p>And we certainly had no idea that our own continuing efforts <a href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeHilPBenWY0yktoM5EeOY58I56q9dH1ZXk-nvp0877WUTDNg/viewform">to collect and share broadband-access stories</a> would so strongly dovetail with <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/telling-broadband-access-stories-jessica-rosenworcel">FCC Acting Chair Rosenworcel’s own desire to collect stories</a>—a realization that has sped up our own process of collecting stories to be submitted to the FCC’s site which was recently created as <a href="https://consumercomplaints.fcc.gov/hc/en-us/requests/new?ticket_form_id=360001440131">a repository</a> for <a href="https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/03/fcc-wants-to-hear-from-americans-whove-been-ignored-by-broadband-industry/">stories that can be used in broadband-advocacy efforts</a>. Or that we would be creating <a href="https://courses.cpe.asu.edu/browse/uto/courses/shapingedu-universal-broadband-access">a free four-part course for those wanting to develop their skills as broadband advocates</a>. Or that we would, under the guidance of a community member, be engaged in <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/submit-your-ideas-identifying-broadband-opportunities-american-jobs-plan">an effort to identify broadband opportunities in the American Jobs Plan</a>. Or that we would be participating, as panelists, in virtual conference presentations and <a href="https://linkedin.zoom.us/rec/share/afIrZ1bMMv_LSq0YbY2JLEwQm1NO75Xs-dmhdVd79YgawwwtRg-HUl6jWceimjFk.nkwzlxH7TOHHvZbO">a LinkedIn Learning session</a> for those interested in fostering universal broadband access. </p><p>Yes, it has been a very busy year. And we’re all looking forward to carrying on this work with as many partners as we can attract. If that seems like an open invitation to you, please feel free to accept it by completing <a href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe049skUr_i7iJhwaCToBFx4X3FBr_3bVRZOaC10qgIBegkKA/viewform">this simple form</a> to join the organizing team and participate in our weekly (one-hour) online meetings (generally on Tuesdays, from 4-5 pm ET/1-2 pm PT) whenever you are available. And tell your friends and colleagues that the invitation is open to them, too.</p> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work-learning" hreflang="en">connecting work + learning</a> <a href="/blog/tag/shapingedu" hreflang="en">shapingedu</a> <a href="/blog/tag/jessica-rosenworcel" hreflang="en">jessica rosenworcel</a> <a href="/blog/tag/lyle-ishida" hreflang="en">lyle ishida</a> <a href="/blog/tag/mark-goldstein" hreflang="en">mark goldstein</a> <a href="/blog/tag/steve-peters" hreflang="en">steve peters</a> <a href="/blog/tag/arlene-krebs" hreflang="en">arlene krebs</a> <a href="/blog/tag/dianne-connery" hreflang="en">dianne connery</a> <a href="/blog/tag/lev-gonick" hreflang="en">lev gonick</a> <a href="/blog/tag/beth-holland" hreflang="en">beth holland</a> <a href="/blog/tag/gina-millsap" hreflang="en">gina millsap</a> <a href="/blog/tag/american-jobs-plan" hreflang="en">american jobs plan</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 24 May 2021 23:14:26 +0000 psignorelli 1717630 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 2 of 2) https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/beth-holland-barriers-challenges-and-empathy-fostering-broadband-access-part-2-2 <h1 class="article"> Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 2 of 2) </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Thu, 02/11/2021 - 18:44</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/shapingedu_connecting_for_work_and_learning1.png?itok=5eCIEPcu" width="1224" height="622" alt="Graphic image for ShapingEDU &quot;Connecting for Work and Learning&quot; broadband-access initiative" title="ShapingEDU &quot;Connecting for Work and Learning&quot; broadband-access initiative" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/beth-holland">beth holland</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 2 of 2) </h1> </div> <div class="block"> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">What we do with </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_universal_service">universal broadband-access</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> is clearly as important as the efforts we are making, though the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/home">ShapingEDU</a><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">“Connecting for Work and Learning”</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> initiative, to foster that level of access—a theme consistently present during the interview I did recently with </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.edutopia.org/profile/beth-holland">Dr. Beth Holland</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, Partner at </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://learningaccelerator.org/">The Learning Accelerator</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and Digital Equity Advisor to </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/about-cosn">CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking)</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, for the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog">ShapingEDU blog</a>.</p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/common_sense-looking_back_looking_forward-digital_divide-cover.png?itok=_ynGGZnr" width="513" height="655" alt="Looking Back, Looking Forward: K-12 Digital Divide report" title="Looking Back, Looking Forward: K-12 Digital Divide report" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p> </p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Too many assumptions get made about whether access in itself will solve the issues,” she suggested. “However, we have to remember the diversity of this country. It’s going to be very different depending on the culture and context of each community. I was just reading a new report [</span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.bcg.com/en-us/press/27january2021-digital-divide-narrowed-must-close-eliminate-risks-students-economy"><em>Looking Back, Looking Forward: What It Will Take to Permanently Close the K-12 Digital Divide</em></a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, January 27, 2021] this morning from </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.commonsensemedia.org/about-us/our-mission">Common Sense</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.bcg.com/en-us/about/about-bcg/overview">BCG [Boston Consulting Group]</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. They touch on this idea that a barrier to adoption could be more cognitive than financial or geographic/physical (e.g., no service). </span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Another point: Have you seen </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.nyu.edu/about/leadership-university-administration/office-of-the-president/office-of-the-provost/faculty-affairs/charlton-mcilwain.html">Dr. Charlton McIlwain’s</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> book on </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://global.oup.com/academic/product/black-software-9780190863845?cc=us&amp;lang=en&amp;"><em>Black Software: The Internet &amp; Racial Justice, from the AfroNet to Black Lives Matter</em></a><em style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">,</em><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> or </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S._Craig_Watkins">Dr. S. Craig Watkins’</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> work in </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://nyupress.org/9781479854110/the-digital-edge/"><em>The Digital Edge: How Black and Latino Youth Navigate Digital Inequality</em></a><em style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">?</em><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> Both of them, in different ways, touch on the white narrative surrounding technology adoption. Particularly for non-white communities, adoption could look different. Universal access needs to be considered from a more universal perspective, and all voices need to be honored and valued in designing solutions (e.g., stop saying that underserved communities could get served with refurbished devices that the white/affluent community doesn’t want.).”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">It's a theme that consistently flows through her writing, including her CoSN article </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/blog/digital-equity-isn%E2%80%99t-just-about-equal-access-technology#:~:text=Digital%20Equity%20isn't%20just%20about%20Equal%20Access%20to%20Technology,-Beth%20Holland%2C%20EdD&amp;text=By%20focusing%20on%20how%20technology,for%20system%2Dwide%20school%20improvement.">“Digital Equity Isn’t Just About Equal Access to Technology”</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> (July 11, 2019), which includes a summary of what she saw happening in the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.k12albemarle.org/">Albemarle County [Virginia] Public Schools</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">: “From the start, the district recognized that the most critical component of Digital Equity may be whether or not the students and teachers possess the literacy to take advantage of the available tools….Beyond just installing software, the district has also created a multi-tiered support system that includes coaching and professional development for both students and teachers. Additionally, teachers as well as middle and high school students have administrative control over their laptops so that they can customize their devices to best meet their individual needs. The technology department recognizes that without this opportunity to develop these digital literacy skills, teachers and students will not be able to take advantage of the technology to improve their own learning.”</span></p> <div class="embedded-media" driving="" k-12="" innovation="" report=""> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/cosn-driving_k-12_innovation-20211.png?itok=SNxRQ28i" width="333" height="446" alt="CoSN " title="CoSN &quot;Driving K-12 Innovation report" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p> </p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Digital equity is a theme that also receives abundant attention in CoSN’s recently-released </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://cosn.org/k12innovation/hurdles-accelerators">“Driving K-12 Innovation: 2021 Hurdles + Accelerators”</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> report, where it is seen as one of the top three hurdles to innovation in K-12 learning. The writers of the report cite data cost, access to digital devices as well as to the Internet itself, limited tech literacy among the parents of some of our K-12 learners, and the challenges parents face in facilitating online learning while those same parents are attempting to work and take care of their children.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“This comes back to the empathy comment that you made earlier: any solution really needs to consider the context and community. What needs to happen beyond access and digital literacy to also address broader issues of media literacy and even algorithmic literacy? I’ve been thinking about the issues of Pandora’s box. We can open it and let things out, but if we haven’t considered the potential unintended consequences of throwing out access without helping students and adults fully develop an understanding of the implications and connotations, then the potential exists to further inequity and not address it. The </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.digitalinclusion.org/">NDIA [National Digital Inclusion Alliance]</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> has been having this conversation a lot lately, and I think that it’s an important one.” </span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">All of which brings us back to a key point of the conversation we had: what can those interested in fostering universal broadband access for work and learning do?</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Nationally, there needs to be policy changes to make broadband access seen as a public good—like electricity or water,” she suggests. “There also needs to be funding to support both school and home access for students….Regionally, I guess this is tricky because regions are so diverse in this country. A lot of states have regional education groups. A big thing to consider is how regional groups can band together to have more collective bargaining power….Locally, I think it’s important to be aware of who does/doesn’t have access. Teachers may either over/under estimate the amount of connectivity that their students have. </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/matt-hiefield-36391352/">Matthew Hiefield</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, from Beaverton, Oregon, helped me write </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/blog/five-opportunities-tackle-digital-equity-start-school-year">a post a while ago about questions to ask students</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/tchristie/">Teshon Christie</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> in Kent, Washington made a great point about not only assuming students have access, but [about] the danger of assuming that they don’t. He’s found that some families prioritize access while others may not. His district has been very deliberate about finding out who needs support from the district instead of using a general metric like free or reduced-price lunch to drive assumptions.”</span></p><p><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em>N.B. – 1)  For more information about the Connecting for Work and Learning initiative or to become involved, please visit the <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">project page on the ShapingEDU website</a> or contact <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/Universal-Broadband-Organizing-Committee">organizing committee members</a></em></strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">.</span><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em> 2) <strong>For a lightly-edited transcript of Paul’s interview with Holland, please visit his <a href="https://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/?s=Promoting+Universal+Broadband+Access+With+Beth+Holland+%28Part">Building Creative Bridges</a> blog.</strong></em></strong></p> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/beth-holland" hreflang="en">beth holland</a> <a href="/blog/tag/cosn" hreflang="en">cosn</a> <a href="/blog/tag/driving-k-12-innovation" hreflang="en">Driving K-12 Innovation</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/collaboration" hreflang="en">collaboration</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-inclusion" hreflang="en">digital inclusion</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-equity" hreflang="en">digital equity</a> <a href="/blog/tag/looking-back-looking-forward" hreflang="en">looking back looking forward</a> <a href="/blog/tag/common-sense" hreflang="en">common sense</a> <a href="/blog/tag/bcg" hreflang="en">bcg</a> <a href="/blog/tag/boston-consulting-group" hreflang="en">boston consulting group</a> <a href="/blog/tag/charlton-mcilwain" hreflang="en">charlton mcilwain</a> <a href="/blog/tag/black-software" hreflang="en">black software</a> <a href="/blog/tag/craig-watkins" hreflang="en">craig watkins</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-edge" hreflang="en">digital edge</a> <a href="/blog/tag/albemarle-county-public-schools" hreflang="en">albemarle county public schools</a> <a href="/blog/tag/ndia" hreflang="en">ndia</a> <a href="/blog/tag/national-digital-inclusion-alliance" hreflang="en">national digital inclusion alliance</a> <a href="/blog/tag/matthew-hiefield" hreflang="en">matthew hiefield</a> <a href="/blog/tag/teshon-christie" hreflang="en">teshon christie</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 12 Feb 2021 01:44:00 +0000 psignorelli 1519773 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 1 of 2) https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog/beth-holland-barriers-challenges-and-empathy-fostering-broadband-access-part-1-2 <h1 class="article"> Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 1 of 2) </h1> <span><span lang="" about="/users/psignorelli" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">psignorelli</span></span> <span>Thu, 02/11/2021 - 18:29</span> <div class="layout layout--onecol"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--content"> </div> </div> <div class="layout__fixed-width"> <div class="bg-top bg-percent-100 max-size-container center-container"> <div class="container"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-12"> <div class="layout__region layout__region--first"> <div class="block"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu-universal_broadband1.png?itok=i_bd1whL" width="300" height="387" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /> </div> <div class="block block-webspark-module-asu-breadcrumb"> <section class="bg-white spacing-top-24 spacing-bottom-24"> <nav class="uds-content-align" aria-label="breadcrumbs"> <ol class="breadcrumb"> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/">Home</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="/blog/tag/beth-holland">beth holland</a> </li> <li class="breadcrumb-item"> <a href="">Feed</a> </li> </ol> </nav> </section> </div> <div class="block"> <h1 class="article"> Beth Holland: Barriers, Challenges, and Empathy in Fostering Broadband Access (Part 1 of 2) </h1> </div> <div class="block"> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">A story that has become painfully familiar as the coronavirus pandemic has raged around us: without adequate Internet access, we are severely limited in our ability to work and learn effectively. A story that is not so obvious: any successful effort to create </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadband_universal_service">universal broadband access</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> throughout the United States is going to have to be accompanied by efforts to foster </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.digitalinclusion.org/definitions/#:~:text=Digital%20Equity,our%20society%2C%20democracy%20and%20economy.">digital equity and digital inclusion</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> in numerous ways—a conclusion that became more clear to me than ever before as I conducted an online interview recently, for the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/blog">ShapingEDU blog</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, with </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.edutopia.org/profile/beth-holland">Dr. Beth Holland</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, Partner at </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://learningaccelerator.org/">The Learning Accelerator</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> and Digital Equity Advisor to </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/about-cosn">CoSN (the Consortium for School Networking)</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">.</span> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-drupal-media"> <div class="embedded-media" align="left"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/holland_beth1_0.jpg?itok=LJlV_FYl" width="719" height="1080" alt="Beth Holland" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <figcaption><span>Beth Holland</span></figcaption></figure><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Simply getting [universal broadband] access does not solve the problem [of digital equity],” she observed during a conversation that weaved back and forth between focusing on the barriers we face to creating universal broadband access and the challenges we face in trying to equitably use that access to support work and learning. “It’s going to continue to morph as technologies change.” </span></p><p>An often-overlooked theme that emerged overall was how important empathy is going to be in any successful effort to provide universal broadband access. Both of us acknowledged, as we were looking at who has access and who doesn’t—as well as how that access is used in work and learning environments—that fostering empathy for those without access and support can be a critically important part of any effort to extend access and nurture equity and inclusion. </p><p>“I am going to admit my privilege here,” she said. “Where I am geographically located, I have full cell service and access to high-speed Internet. I’ve had a laptop, plus numerous other devices, since the late 1990s. However, I think the real wakeup call has happened in a few different instances. First, my husband and I like to do a lot of hiking. When we drive places, I’ve become incredibly attuned to whether or not we have cell service—not because I want to be online, but because I’m trying to get a sense of the magnitude of the disparity of access in a tangible way. We drove from Salt Lake City to Escalante National Park a few years ago, and I counted miles between cell signals and any place of business that might possibly offer Wi-Fi to kids. It made me realize how some possible solutions to the digital divide really aren’t feasible. Last fall, we were driving in rural New Hampshire with no signal. At one point, a Dollar Store was the only major business, and it was about 30 minutes to find a gas station. I saw satellite dishes in yards, so I am guessing there was no cable. I was thinking about conditions of schools and the feasibility of getting access. It made me very aware of the need for policymakers to take a ride and recognize the challenge that so many are facing right now to get access.” </p><p>An updated rallying cry for those without inadequate access might, in fact, be “take a ride with us” rather than “walk in our boots,” for the act of taking that ride—as Holland and other colleagues have done—hammers home the impact inadequate broadband access has on people not only distant from us but in our own geographical backyards.</p> <div class="embedded-media"> <img loading="lazy" src="/sites/default/files/styles/shaping_edu_blog_-_hero__fp_/public/blog/shapingedu-universal_broadband1.png?itok=i_bd1whL" width="300" height="387" alt="ShapingEDU universal broadband initiative image" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-fluid" /></div> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“A few years ago, I was doing research in pre-schools as part of my post-doc. I got a text message on my phone that there was a new message in the medical portal from my doctor. The portal didn’t work on a mobile device, so I logged in when I got home (privileges #1-3: cell signal, home Internet, and a computer). Apparently, I was at high-risk for measles, and there were ongoing outbreaks at the time. I could schedule an appointment for a blood test to see if my vaccine was still good. Turns out that it wasn’t, and I needed a new vaccine from CVS. Everything was coordinated through the portal and took no time, but what about the person who didn’t know to sign up for the portal, who couldn’t access it, and who might not have the </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_literacy">digital-literacy</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> skills to navigate it? Understanding all of this has made me hyperaware of the digital-equity challenges—not just in terms of physical access, but also the necessary skills behind having that access.”</span></p><p>First, of course, we need to work together at the big, dreamy level our predecessors did they they created a national postal service to meet communication needs; when they worked to create a telephone system that further enhanced our ability to engage in effective communication; and when they united at the national level to provide electricity throughout the entire country. That’s where the organizers of the <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/home">ShapingEDU</a> <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">“Connecting for Work and Learning: Universal Broadband Access in the United States”</a> initiative has been focusing since its inception in May 2020 to connect and support existing groups and interested individuals.</p><p>Some of the barriers that are easily identifiable include cost, geography, and competing/conflicting interests among some key stakeholders.</p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“I think the first part is to be really aware of geography and whether or not infrastructure is possible,” Holland said. “In urban/suburban areas where the barrier is more often cost, then it’s a matter of creating affordable </span><em style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">high-speed </em><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">options. (There are lots of complaints that low-cost broadband isn’t enough bandwidth to do anything meaningful.) Solutions here could be allowing E-Rate to offset the cost for qualifying families, or working with housing authorities, communities, and anchor institutions to create more affordable solutions. A great example is Boulder Valley, in Colorado. </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://digitalbridgek12.org/toolkit/deploy/boulder-valley/">The district created a public-private partnership with a local ISP</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. The company put </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fl9-VLhFtQ4">towers on top of the schools to broadcast Internet, and families in need could then get access for free.</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> There’s a profit-sharing agreement as well.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“It gets trickier when the geography comes into play. In </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.cosn.org/blog/addressing-homework-gap-through-public-private-partnerships">a blog post [describing the Boulder Valley project]</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">, a district in upstate New York [is mentioned because it] created a “neighbor-to-neighbor” network to connect kids. The </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_service_provider">ISP</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> said that they could not afford to run cable to many houses because they are so far apart from each other. Instead, the district got a grant to find houses with connections and then put antennas on top of barns/grain silos/roofs. They could then broadcast Wi-Fi for up to five miles from one house to another. </span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Hotspots can be any option when there is cell service, and some districts such as </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.pcmag.com/news/spacexs-starlink-to-supply-free-satellite-internet-to-families-in-texas">Ector County in Texas</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"> have started experimenting with satellite connections for really rural locations. </span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">“Finally, some districts have come up with ways to create their own LTE/5G networks. </span><a style="font-size: 1em;" href="https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHBD_enUS896US897&amp;ei=9WIcYJDTBsys0PEPn_27iAw&amp;q=school+district+install+internet+tower&amp;oq=school+district+install+internet+tower&amp;gs_lcp=CgZwc3ktYWIQAzIFCCEQoAEyBQghEKABOgcIABBHELADOgQIIRAKOgUIIRCrAlD4PlinlQFgo5sBaAFwAngAgAGnAogBniSSAQY2LjIyLjSYAQCgAQGqAQdnd3Mtd2l6yAEIwAEB&amp;sclient=psy-ab&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjQoeKnktHuAhVMFjQIHZ_-DsEQ4dUDCA0&amp;uact=5">They install towers around the community and can then provide Internet to their families</a><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">. Michigan has a big project in partnership with Northern Michigan University and the surrounding K-12 districts. Green Bay, Wisconsin did this, and there are others,” she noted.</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Another barrier to be overcome is our view of what Internet service actually is—a commodity, a service, a public good, or something else: “Currently, internet is considered a service and not a utility. Therefore, that’s how it’s regulated. There really isn’t the financial incentive or pressure to run broadband to every community—especially the hard-to-reach ones. There are some advocates calling for internet to become a utility so that the country can be wired in a fashion similar to the electrification project in the 1930s. Finally, and this is tied to regulation, we really have to remember cost. Even low-cost options could be too much for a family to afford. The argument can be made for internet to be considered as part of the life-line program that ensures phone access as a matter of public safety…. Nationally, there needs to be policy changes to make broadband access seen as a public good—like electricity or water. There also needs to be funding to support both school and home access for students.”</span></p><p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">Once we do overcome those barriers and move steadily closer to examining the challenges of inclusion and equity, we begin to tackle some of the related issues requiring our attention—as we’ll see in the second of these two interrelated articles.</span></p><p><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em>N.B. – 1)  For more information about the Connecting for Work and Learning initiative or to become involved, please visit the <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/connecting-for-learning">project page on the ShapingEDU website</a> or contact <a href="https://shapingedu.asu.edu/Universal-Broadband-Organizing-Committee">organizing committee members</a></em></strong><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;">.</span><strong style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 1em;"><em> 2) <strong>For a lightly-edited transcript of Paul’s interview with Holland, please visit his <a href="https://buildingcreativebridges.wordpress.com/?s=Promoting+Universal+Broadband+Access+With+Beth+Holland+%28Part">Building Creative Bridges</a> blog.</strong></em></strong></p> </div> <div class="block"> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/category/projects" hreflang="en">Projects</a> </div> <div class="block"> <a href="/blog/tag/activism" hreflang="en">activism</a> <a href="/blog/tag/activists" hreflang="en">activists</a> <a href="/blog/tag/beth-holland" hreflang="en">beth holland</a> <a href="/blog/tag/cosn" hreflang="en">cosn</a> <a href="/blog/tag/broadband-access" hreflang="en">broadband access</a> <a href="/blog/tag/collaboration" hreflang="en">collaboration</a> <a href="/blog/tag/connecting-work" hreflang="en">connecting for work</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-inclusion" hreflang="en">digital inclusion</a> <a href="/blog/tag/digital-equity" hreflang="en">digital equity</a> <a href="/blog/tag/boulder-valley-school-district" hreflang="en">boulder valley school district</a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> Fri, 12 Feb 2021 01:29:02 +0000 psignorelli 1519772 at https://shapingedu.asu.edu